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  • Hitler's Mein Kampf may return to Bavarian schools
    #11
    Seeing as how that isn't exactly on topic, let me say this:

    Hitler didn't do good things . . . that's something even Snilloc understands (sorry sni Hysterical ) but he did excel at motivating large numbers of people to do ridiculous things (like taking acid and crystal meth and heading into war) and horrible things that I'd rather not think of. How he was able to do that is a sort of mystery that needs unraveling still.

    If Hitler had access to a communication system like we have today and he had been facing opponents with the same technology, I think he would've managed to come out on top. His charisma combined with that kind of platform to spread his message would have been hard to stop. (thus the Internet aside)

    Wildcard is awesome.
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    #12
    i think its relevant to the discussion as it reinforces the subject matter of mein kampf (superiority).

    during wwII, hitler possessed advanced technology and weapons that were superior to the entire worlds... that includes guns, bombs, tanks, jet engines, the plans for nuclear weapons, communications (including encryption)... etc...

    he still lost because technology is not a replacement for will power. look at the russian invasion of afganistan... the afgans beat the crap out of the russians with improvised weapons, guerrilla tactics and a serious lack of education.

    claiming that the internet could have led to a german victory is hard to believe since in the end, his insanity lead to his own defeat.

    "Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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    #13
    Hitler's main tool was propaganda. Having a stronger voice would've resulted in a different outcome.

    Wildcard is awesome.
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    #14
    i think you are confusing new forms of communications with the reach of communications.

    back then, the radio, movie theaters and newspapers could reach just as many people as the net does.... maybe even more since a lot of people don't have computers, let alone internet connections.

    in fact, i would dare to say his voice was more likely to be heard back then than it is now since there was less competition for attention.

    "Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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    #15
    I think he could've adapted. With the more secure forms of communication via the Net he could've conquered the world through the wires and never had to leave his bunker.

    Wildcard is awesome.
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    #16
    the enigma machine was a very secure form of communication. the only reason we were able to break the code was by gaining several of the devices. along with their radio communications, he never did have to leave the bunker. towards the end of the war and after several assassination attempts, he didn't leave the bunker.

    "Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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    #17
    The two volumes of Mein Kampf were published in 1925 and 1926, before Hitler became chancellor of Germany.

    They do not spell out the details of any plan to murder all the Jews of Europe, but they do make clear his driving racism.

    Unlike public displays of the Nazi salute or the swastika, selling it in Germany is not actually against the law, simply a breach of copyright.

    After the war, the victorious Allies gave the right to publish Mein Kampf in Germany to Bavaria so it can prohibit publication, which it always has.

    It was this that persuaded a reputable magazine in Germany to pull back from publishing extracts with notes by historians earlier this year.

    When the copyright expires, there is no great expectation of a sales bonanza. Many, including Italian dictator Mussolini, have found the book boring.

    Edith Raim of the Institute of Contemporary History, said of the post-copyright version she is preparing:

    "Our book won't find any buyers in the Neo-Nazi scene. It's going to be a solid scientific work".
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    #18
    ...and back to the current progression of the discussion...

    "Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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    #19
    I don't know that they need to worry about Neo-Nazis getting all excited about a book -- most of the ones I've met can't read anyway.

    No fucking censorship. Ever.
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    #20
    i remember my grandfather having a copy,he bought it before the war,he was a hard core socialist,on asking why he had the book he answered,to understand the man and what drives him you have to read it.

    consistency is the hobdob
    of small minds[
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