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Quick fix for Hotmail password bug
#1
Microsoft has rushed out a fix for a serious bug in its Hotmail webmail services.
The bug allowed a hacker to reset the password for a Hotmail account, locking out its owner and giving the attacker access to the inbox.
The fix was put together because the bug was starting to be actively exploited online.
One security news site reported that some hackers were offering to hack Hotmail accounts for $20 (£12).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17866897
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#2
Never liked HotMail myself. I use GMail and Thunderbird.
My Torrents Are HERE And HERE Big GrinYay
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#3
I still have Hotmail accounts but like Live.co.uk:p
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#4
I don't think it really matters which one you use. their all as secure or unsecure as each other IMO. All mail sent goes across the web "naked" so, if someone wants to they can snatch it with not too much effort.
My Torrents Are HERE And HERE Big GrinYay
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#5
(04-27-2012, 06:22 AM)2010kaiser Wrote: I don't think it really matters which one you use. their all as secure or unsecure as each other IMO. All mail sent goes across the web "naked" so, if someone wants to they can snatch it with not too much effort.

it can go around naked, but it doesn't have to. you can easily encrypt the content before sending.

hotmail, however, imho... sucks ass.

i do like gmail, but i'm starting to wonder if will ever be out of beta testing. with the advent of googles +1, most so called hackers would agree that its far easier to just pish a gmail password than crack it.
"Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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#6
(04-27-2012, 07:40 AM)stormium Wrote:
(04-27-2012, 06:22 AM)2010kaiser Wrote: I don't think it really matters which one you use. their all as secure or unsecure as each other IMO. All mail sent goes across the web "naked" so, if someone wants to they can snatch it with not too much effort.

it can go around naked, but it doesn't have to. you can easily encrypt the content before sending.

hotmail, however, imho... sucks ass.

i do like gmail, but i'm starting to wonder if will ever be out of beta testing. with the advent of googles +1, most so called hackers would agree that its far easier to just pish a gmail password than crack it.

For non IT geeks in other words plain speaking English what does that mean?
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#7
it means try a different thread Tongue

naked = non encrypted

beta = non finished pre-release

google +1 = a new level of faggotry for facebook fanatics.

pish/phish = trick a user into giving you their password

imho = in my humble opinion

so called hackers = script kiddies

sucks ass = microsoft
"Yeah. I understand the mechanics of it, shithead. I just don't understand how this is any less retarded than what I'm suggesting." - Kiley; Housebound.
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#8
(04-27-2012, 11:33 AM)stormium Wrote: naked = non encrypted

beta = non finished pre-release

google +1 = a new level of faggotry for facebook fanatics.

pish/phish = trick a user into giving you their password

imho = in my humble opinion

so called hackers = script kiddies

sucks ass = microsoft

Very succinct. Smile
Wildcard is awesome.
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#9
Here's some reading for you snilly:

Packet sniffers are specialized tools that are usually designed to help network administrators in monitoring networks and troubleshoot network problems. However, these tools can be dangerous for security if used in the wrong fashion.

A packet sniffer is either some kind of hardware appliance, or software installed on a desktop or server computer, that has the ability to capture network packets and record them, usually for network maintenance and monitoring purposes. Such tools are called packet sniffers, but they may also have different names, like packet analyzer or protocol analyzer, traffic analyzer etc. Anyway, this kind of tools, either hardware or full software based, can intercept network traffic on a given hub or switch (a so called network node) and monitor one or more protocols, extract valuable data from it and store it for later analysis and processing.

The problem is that packet sniffers can be dangerous for security of computers, due to their ability of intercepting network packets and recording them. A packet sniffer is a stealth tool. Users have no knowledge whatsoever, that their own traffic is being recorded; there is no common way to detect that a sniffer is currently recording your data transmitted over the network; so it would be rather useful to assume it is, in all cases, and take whatever measures to protect yourself from this kind of information leakage.

The biggest risk coming from packet sniffers is the ability to record user names and passwords. The risk comes from the fact that many Internet protocols widely used today are still unsecure. World Wide Web uses data in non-encrypted format, so it is easy for a packet sniffer to detect what websites you are visiting and which pages, apart from the case when secure socket connections are used via https:// based pages. Email is mainly unencrypted and can be easily sniffed. Internet Relay chat conversations can be also easily recorded via packet sniffers. Many Internet messenger programs are still using unencrypted transmissions, and therefore they are vulnerable to packet sniffing. FTP communications are vulnerable as well. And there are many other protocols still relying on plain text transmissions. As an important thing to keep in mind, please note that Cable – based Internet connections are usually connected into a single large network that can be easily sniffed so if you have such a connection, the risk of your data being compromised via packet sniffers is very high.

What to do? First of all, be aware that every network activity coming from your computer, using an Internet protocol that is non-encrypted, can be recorded and your information can be compromised. You should never send passwords via email; use encrypted email for example through secure connections to web based email systems like Yahoo for example. Use secured web pages whenever available; many sites can be browsed via https:// although the site may not advertise this. Never send any user names or passwords via unsecured Internet protocols. Be informed, learn about possible risks from security news and documentation available on the Internet, and how you can protect yourself from all these risks.
Phishing is an e-mail fraud method in which the perpetrator sends out legitimate-looking email in an attempt to gather personal and financial information from recipients. Typically, the messages appear to come from well known and trustworthy Web sites. Web sites that are frequently spoofed by phishers include PayPal, eBay, MSN, Yahoo, BestBuy, and America Online. A phishing expedition, like the fishing expedition it's named for, is a speculative venture: the phisher puts the lure hoping to fool at least a few of the prey that encounter the bait.

Phishers use a number of different social engineering and e-mail spoofing ploys to try to trick their victims. In one fairly typical case before the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), a 17-year-old male sent out messages purporting to be from America Online that said there had been a billing problem with recipients' AOL accounts. The perpetrator's e-mail used AOL logos and contained legitimate links. If recipients clicked on the "AOL Billing Center" link, however, they were taken to a spoofed AOL Web page that asked for personal information, including credit card numbers, personal identification numbers (PINs), social security numbers, banking numbers, and passwords. This information was used for identity theft.
My Torrents Are HERE And HERE Big GrinYay
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#10
(04-27-2012, 11:33 AM)stormium Wrote: google +1 = a new level of faggotry for facebook fanatics.

LMAO best description ever... oh stormium, you are so wise...
No fucking censorship. Ever.
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